Category Archives: Historical Word Wednesday

Historical Word Wednesday: Burnish

Wednesday'sBurnish

Verb

1. To grow fat.

“The expression, “You burnish nicely” meaning, “You look well.” is frequently used in East Sussex, and is meant as a compliment.”

From A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect and Collection of Provincialisms in Use in the County of Sussex by W.D. Parish.

I thought this was interesting… Reminds me of the modern term: phat.

Historical Word Wednesday: Concerned in Liquor

Wednesday'sConcerned in Liquor

Adjective

1. Drunk

“This is one of many expressions used in Sussex to avoid the word drunk. To have a little beer, means to have a great deal too much; to have half-a-pint-other-while, means to be a habitual drunkard; to be none the better for which he had took, means to be much the worse; to be noways tossicated, implies abject helplessness. A Sussex man may be tight or concerned in liquor, but drunk never!

In the village of Selmeston, the blacksmith’s shop is next door to the public-house. I have met numbers of people going up to the forge, but never one going to the Barley-mow.”

From A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect and Collection of Provincialisms in Use in the County of Sussex by W.D. Parish.

Well, I never…

Historical Word Wednesday: Byste

Wednesday'sByste

Verb

1. To lie down in the day time.

“I was quite took to (ashamed) to think you should have come in the other day and found me bysted, but I was quite entirely eat up with the rheumatics, and couldn’t get about no how’s.”

From A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect and Collection of Provincialisms in Use in the County of Sussex by W.D. Parish.

I byste every single day. Or I would like to anyway…